Christopher Goes to Law School

Christopher Sabec University of GeorgiaThe University of Georgia was renowned for their program in international law. Dean Rusk, Secretary of State under President Johnson, had built a research center there. It seemed like a great fit for Christopher. After visiting the campus to help Christopher with the decision, he met with the Dead and he offered Christopher a partial tuition scholarship if he would attend. Christopher had already fallen in love with Athens and its thriving music scene. The decision was easy after his visit and he gave notice to the Tax Court that he would start law school in the fall.
Law school began under very difficult circumstances for Christopher. On August 2, 1989, when he was 24 years old, he broke his neck in an auto accident. While sitting at the stop light in his hometown, he was struck from behind by a driver who had lost control of his can. He had suffered a fracture of his C1 and C2 vertebras and there was no choice but to operate. Christopher underwent eight hours of surgery and spent the next three weeks in the hospital. During his recuperation, he struggled with whether to delay law school until the following year, but after a lot of internal debate and with the help of a very supportive family and welcoming student body, Christopher began his first year of law school a couple of days late and with some serious rehabilitation ahead. To say his first year was intense would be an understatement. It was grueling, both physically (due to the surgery) and mentally (due to the workload).
During Christopher’s winder break, he started to consider his options for the summer. Setting a long-term goal of working as an international attorney in either the State Department or on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, he began to explore internship opportunities in Washington for the summer. He was pleasantly surprised when he found a directory of all the programs available in Washington for law students. As he had hoped, there were programs at the State Department and the Senate, so he mailed letters and resumes to both. As an afterthought, Christopher decided to send in one more package-a long shot application to The Office of the Counsel to the President at the White House. It was less an exercise in why, then one in why not; after all, he had nothing to lose.